Why are we obsessed with Muslim women?

EDIT: disclaimer that this is from my perspective in Britain and primarily about rhetoric here and in other Western European/North American contexts. The hijab, burqa, burkini, FGM, ‘honour killings’ and ‘forced marriages’ are familiar tropes when it comes to thinking about migration and Islam in ‘the West’. Their prevalence represents the slippage between ‘women’s rights’ and questions of national borders and religion, reflecting the way … Continue reading Why are we obsessed with Muslim women?

An A-Z on being Muslim in Britain in 2015

I’ve noticed that Islam and my identity as a Muslim are the things I mention least on this blog. If I’m honest I have deliberately avoided talking about Islam at times this year. My silence has felt heavy, but the truth is that it’s been difficult to talk about. Difficult as an individual, difficult as a Muslim and difficult as someone who visibly identifies with … Continue reading An A-Z on being Muslim in Britain in 2015

Cambridge: the benevolent aggressor

Seeing all the new faces around Cambridge this past week has made me rather sentimental. Memories of fresher’s week and the whole fear-ridden first term come flooding back. I search amongst those new faces especially for brown and black faces. I search for them because I wish somebody had searched for me. Everytime I see a woman in a hijab I feel overwhelmed with excitement, … Continue reading Cambridge: the benevolent aggressor

Victim or Villain: How to avoid turning a Condemnation into an Apology?

It seems now that we have reached the point in the media and in society at large that whenever there is a terrorist attack performed by Islamic extremists the conversation comes in two rounds. One: condemnation and then -as if to counter any calls of racism – the next round of ‘Muslim as Victims’. While on the one hand I do see some positive aspects to this: it reminds that … Continue reading Victim or Villain: How to avoid turning a Condemnation into an Apology?